Art links

Nobuhiro Nakanishi


Nobuhiro Nakanishi’s mesmerizing body of work entitled Layered Drawings is truly breathtaking. He photographs a scene or object repeatedly over time, then laser prints each shot and mounts them onto acrylic. Change is captured in each frame, and once layered, they become sculpture installations. The overall effect shows movement and the subtle passage of time.

via Nobuhiro Nakanishi|中西信洋


What really happened after these photos were taken


Photojournalist Eddie Adams captured one of the most famous images of the Vietnam War – the very instant of an execution during the chaos of the Tet Offensive. It would bring him a lifetime of glory, but as James Jeffrey writes, also of sorrow.

via What really happened after these photos were taken – BBC News

Decasia: Excerpt Three (Bill Morrison, 2002) – YouTube

The film is a meditation on old, decaying silent films, featuring segments of earlier movies re-edited and integrated into a new narrative. Critic Glen Kenny described Decasia as an “abstract narrative about mortality in all of its manifestations.”[1]

It begins and ends with scenes of a dervish and is bookended with old footage showing how film is processed. Nothing was done to accelerate the decomposition of the actual film prints, some of which were copied from the University of South Carolina‘s Moving Image Research Collections.[2]